Growing Your Own Sprouts, Healthy and Easy, too!

Hello readers! Handyman here to talk about growing your own sprouts. Are you looking for something easy to do that has amazing nutritional and health benefits? Growing your own sprouts is exactly what you’re looking for!

In this post I’ll list the main benefits of sprouting wheat, quinoa, broccoli, chia, alfalfa, beans, and flax. I’ll also be going over how to sprout each type.

Growing your own sprouts 3 jarsGrowing Your Own Sprouts

Main benefits of Sprouted Wheat

B vitamins, Vitamin C, folate, fiber, and essential amino acids.

How to Sprout:
  • Fill 1 quart jar 1/4 full of wheat berries
  • Then fill the rest of the jar with water (room temperature)
  • Let it soak for 6 to 12 hours
  • Drain
  • Use a mesh top lid to keep weed in the jar as you keep the jar upside down at a slight angle to drain.
  • Rinse them three times a day
  • Once the roots start to emerge, the seeds are ready to be used.
Main benefits of Sprouted Quinoa

Fiber, protein, all 9 essential amino acids, magnesium, D vitamins, iron, potassium, phosphorus, Vitamin E, and antioxidants.

How to Sprout:
  • Same as Sprouted Wheat
Main Benefits of Sprouted Broccoli

Growing your own sprouts organic broccoliAlthough broccoli sprouts have many vitamins and minerals, they’re better used for their health benefits; They help detox environmental pollutants. They have glucosinolate, glucosophanin, sulforophane, and isothiocyanate. These do everything from driving out toxins to fighting cancer and heart problems!

How to Sprout:
  • In a pint jar, place 2 tablespoons of broccoli seedsGrowing your own sprouts broccoli
  • Fill the rest of the jar full of water and let soak for 6 to 12 hours
  • Drain after adding mesh top to the jar, keep the jar upside down at a slight angle
  • Important note: Make sure the seeds don’t block the entire amount for the jar so air can get in easily.
  • Rinse 2 to 3 times a day
  • You can use the sprouts is soon as roots emerge, but I wait until they fill the jar with sprouts before I use them
Main benefits of Sprouted Alfalfa

Vitamin K, Vitamin C, folate, manganese, copper, phosphorus, magnesium, riboflavin, zinc, iron, thiamine, and Vitamin A

How to Sprout:

  • Same as Sprouted Broccoli
Growing your own sproutsMain benefits of Sprouted Beans

Antioxidants, Vitamin B6, protein, Vitamin C, folate, riboflavin, pantotheni acid, thiamine, and niacin

How to Sprout:

  • Same as Sprouted Broccoli
Main benefits of Sprouted Flax

Omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, protein, Vitamin B1, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, iron, potassium, zinc, and copper

How to Sprout:

  • Place 2 tablespoons of flaxseed in a pint jar
  • Add 4 tablespoons of water
  • Stir seeds around
  • Let sit for 4 hours, then they’re ready to be used
  • Flax doesn’t sprout like traditional seeds. Once they’ve soaked up their fill of water, the seeds have been activated and provide you with the maximum nutrients.
Main benefits of Sprouted Chia

Omega-3 fatty acid, fiber, antioxidants, calcium, manganese, phosphorus, and protein

How to Sprout:

  • Same as Sprouted Flaxseed

Last, But Not Least

The seeds you choose should be certified organic. This will ensure they aren’t genetically modified or filled with nasty pesticides. With the seeds I use a lot of, I sprout 2 tablespoons every other day to make certain I have a fresh supply of sprouted seeds all the time (mainly the broccoli and quinoa). The sprouts make good additions to salads, sandwiches, smoothies, and much more. This is a super simple process that will add many nutritional and health benefits to your life.

All you need to get started, besides the seeds, are a few jars with mesh lids (that you can create yourself if you’d like) and a place to drain the seeds for long periods of time. Here on the homestead, we use a small cookie sheet with a drying rack over it.

Tune in next week, I’ll be getting back to writing about gardening.

Until next time… Handyman is on the job!

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